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Education for the Net Generation - 2. Survey of Children and Parents Concerning Internet Use: A Japan-U.S. Comparison (4)

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6. School Grades and Internet Anxiety

Figure 19 shows the relationship between answers to the question, "Are you anxious when you are not on the Internet?" and answers to the question, "Do you have your own website or profile page?" By conducting the chi-square test for these two factors, I have found that there is a certain significance (X2(3)=80.25, p<.01). Looking at the graph, it is obvious that more children who have their own website or profile page responded that they feel anxious when not on the Internet.


Figure 19: Internet Anxiety × Have Own Website or Profile Page

Figure 20 shows the relationship between the anxiety of not being connected to the Internet and average daily home internet usage. More children who use the Internet for longer hours responded they feel anxious when not on the Internet.

Figure 21 shows the relationship between the anxiety of not being connected and children's grades. More children who had low grades were anxious when not on the Internet. As I explained in Chapter 5, there is no relation between grades and average daily home Internet usage. Therefore, irrespective of how long they use the Internet, it can be said from the graph that more children with better grades are not anxious when they are not on the Internet.


Figure 20: Internet Anxiety × Average Daily Home Internet Usage


Figure 21: Internet Anxiety × Children's Grades



Figure 22: Internet Anxiety × Children's Favorite Subjects

Figure 22 shows the relationship between the anxiety of not being on the Internet and children's favorite subjects. Of those children anxious about not being connected, none responded that they like mathematics/arithmetic, science, and social studies. There is no clear relation between the favorite subjects and the average daily home Internet usage or online activities. However, it does seem that those children who do not have a favorite subject or express an interest in any of the main subjects (excluding languages) are the most likely to be anxious when not on the Internet.

Figures 23 - 26 show the relationship between the anxiety of not being on the Internet and disturbing sites children have seen. It is apparent that more children who have seen disturbing sites responded they feel Internet anxiety.


Figure 23: Internet Anxiety × Exposure to Site Offering Money-making Schemes


Figure 24: Internet Anxiety × Exposure to Site with Corpses


Figure 25: Internet Anxiety × Exposure to Site with Naked Bodies


Figure 26: Internet Anxiety × Exposure to Site with Violence
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