[Taiwan] The Study of Social-Emotional Skills and Resilience for Children aged 4-6 - Projects

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[Taiwan] The Study of Social-Emotional Skills and Resilience for Children aged 4-6

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I. Introduction

According to CASEL(2021), SEL is the process through which all young people and adults acquire and apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to develop healthy identities, manage emotions and achieve personal and collective goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain supportive relationships, and make responsible and caring decisions Activities designed for SEL in educational settings enable children to comprehend emotional fluctuations, consider others' feelings, or express their emotions, enhancing emotional intelligence for smoother interactions in future group settings. Resilience forms the foundation of psychological well-being, referring to one's ability to adapt and recover from negative experiences like stress, adversity, or trauma. When you possess strong resilience, you can bounce back from setbacks while maintaining composure and control, determining your capacity to tackle challenges and influencing your growth and other developmental possibilities, effectively mitigating the risk of burnout.

The concepts of SES (Social-Emotional Skills) and resilience are relatively new in early childhood education in Taiwan. The government-prescribed curriculum for early childhood education only includes teaching social skills. Over the past decade, some higher education institutions have begun to recognize the importance of SES in early childhood education. However, it wasn't until the last five years that some workshops specifically introduced SES to teachers or principals participating in training sessions. They hope to serve as seed teachers and return to their schools to promote SES education. In contrast, resilience is a concept that very few people know how to properly explain. So far, the early childhood education community in Taiwan remains largely unfamiliar with resilience.

In Taiwan, children typically start attending kindergarten from the age of 2 to 5 and engage in over 8 hours of learning each day. This prolonged duration is often due to the prevalence of dual-income households, where parents opt to enroll their children in kindergarten to foster holistic development and cultivate positive attitudes toward life. As a result, apart from parental influence, kindergarten education plays a significant role in shaping children's personalities, worldviews, and values.

Child Research Net (CRN) coordinated a group of Asian countries to process the study of SES and resilience in early childhood education. It was an important research to help ECEC and kindergarten teachers understand more about children, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic.


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Profile:
Anita_Chu.jpg Anita Zichun Chu

Associate Professor, National Taipei University of Education (NTUE), Taiwan, where I've been on faculty since 2010. Specializes in international education, multicultural education, and educational policy analysis. I earned my Ph.D. degrees at University of Texas at Austin, U.S.A. in 1998, and have been the visiting scholar at Montana State University, U.S.A.


Hung_Fu_Tsai.jpg Fu Tsai Hung

Professor, National Taipei University of Education (NTUE), Taiwan, where I've been on faculty since 1993; former chairman of National Association of Early Childhood Education R.O.C. since 2011-2014; former director of Department of Educational Management at NTUE since 2018-2021. Specializes in history of early childhood education, educational policy analysis. I earned my Ph.D. degrees at National Taiwan Normal University in 2000, and have been the visiting scholar at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana in 2014-2015. Currently, my primary research and teaching interests involve the policy and working system of ECEC in Taiwan, and looking at factors that influence and ensure the well-being of early childhood professionals.

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