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Monograph_Senior High School

Special Issue Monographs on Senior High School Students
VOL. 73 How do high school students view work?
VOL. 72 High School Students and Relationships
VOL. 71 A Natural Trend Among High School Students in a High-Tech Society?
VOL. 70 Have High School Students Changed? - Comparisons of 1980, 1992 and 2003 surveys
VOL. 69 High School Students' View of Japan
VOL. 68 The Five-day School Week for Senior High School Students
VOL. 67 High School Teachers and Education Reform
VOL. 66 Comparison of Japanese and South Korean Students' Perceptions of the Family
VOL. 65 Are Students Really Serious?
VOL. 64 Students at Colleges of Technology: A Comparison with the 1982 Survey
VOL. 63 High School Students' Use of Media
VOL. 62 High School Students as Consumers
VOL. 61 What High School Students are Required to Learn at School - Comparison with innovative schools
VOL. 60 Self-image of High School Students
VOL. 59 High School Student's View of the 21st Century
VOL. 58 High School Students' Attitudes toward Time
VOL. 57 The Current Situation of Entrance Examinations for Universities
VOL. 56 How High School Students Look at Others - How to have easy-going interpersonal relationship
VOL. 55 The Collapse of Norms - Values of high school students
VOL. 54 High School Students' Views on School Subjects - Academic skills for entrance exams and life
VOL. 53 Views on Society - Social awareness of high school students
VOL. 52 "Compensated Dating"
VOL. 51 Life and Death for High School Students
VOL. 50 Being Masculine and Feminine

 

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Published Year Volume Number
Title of the Booklet
Survey Sample
Sample Population
Survey Period
Survey Method
Summary 1
Summary 2

2005 Special Issue
Monographs on Senior High School Students
Monograph: Senior High School Students has been a valuable resource for topics pertaining to elementary school children for 25 years since it was first published in 1980. This special issue will be the final one. The following are the topics that have been covered in this series.
Chapter 1. Past issues and concerns. Chapter 2. Senior high school students as youth: Identity issues, Towards a new independence, Feeling comfortable with oneself, etc. Chapter 3. Senior high school students in society: Post-war society and change, Where is hope for the future? Students' perspectives on society in the late 1990s, etc. Chapter 4. Changing goals for the future: Less stressful entrance exams, Changing consciousness, Specialization in future goals, etc. Chapter 5. School and teachers. Chapter 6. The changing family and gender roles: Sexual attitudes and behavior, Changing attitudes toward the family, gender roles, etc.

2005 VOL.73
How do high school students view work?
First to third graders of two public high schools in Saitama prefecture
1,926 (male; 1,033, female; 883, unknown; 10)
July 2004
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Problems of youth employment are receiving much attention these days, in particular, the increase in part-timers and NEETs (not in employment, education, or training). This survey attempted to clarify how high-school students view work. It found that most want jobs that best suits their individual character. When choosing a job, 70.5% stressed the importance of this suitability, much higher than the 31.6% who cited salary as the primary factor. Although a high percentage, 64.9%, still want to enter a large corporation offering stable employment, other important factors in choosing a job are the nature of the job (whether the student liked it or not) and the possibility for expression and growth of one's capabilities. The fact that even large corporations do not necessarily offer stability reflects a general instability inherent in society today. As such, some students feel that it is more important to find work that one likes and wants to do in life. Young people classified as NEETs can be seen to be in a transitional phase of self-searching, but also as one manifestation of the above phenomenon.

2004 VOL.72
High School Students and Relationships
First-year students at private universities in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Chiba and Gifu prefecture
561 (males; 207, females; 296, unknown; 58)
April to May in 2004
Questionnaire distributed by schools
This survey asked first-year students at private universities, primarily in the Tokyo metropolitan area, about their sexual experiences when they were senior high school students. Of the boys, 44.2%, and of the girls, 36.2%, had experienced sex while in senior high school. Those who were personally opposed to having sex while in high school accounted for 34.4 % of the boys and 42.7% of the girls. This indicates that students are about evenly divided between those who are actively interested in having sexual experience and those who are not. When asked which activities and pastimes they gave priority to, they replied friends (49.4%), club activities (26.3%), romantic relationships (14.2%), and studying (12.3%); less than 15% placed prime importance on the romantic relationships. Of the students who replied that they had a romantic partner, approximately 80% of both boys and girls replied that they had kissed several times, and 20% to 30% were in relationships that included sex, going to a "love hotel," etc. However, this survey was only conducted on students at private universities in Tokyo metropolitan area and may not an entirely representative sample.

2004 VOL.71
A Natural Trend Among High School Students in a High-Tech Society?
First to second graders of public high schools in Hokkido, Tokyo and Tottori prefecture
2,015 (males; 1,053, females; 962)
December 2003 to January 2004
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students today have access to an enormous amount of information and advanced technology through television, cell phones, computers and other new devices. But how do students feel about nature, which can be considered the polar opposite of their high-tech lives?
When asked about food, students indicated an overwhelming preference for natural products and methods. Over 92% would rather receive nutrition through food than from dietary supplements. Approximately 80% preferred organically grown vegetables despite a higher price and less appealing appearance to vegetables grown with agricultural chemicals. In their relationships, 90% preferred seeing their girlfriend or boyfriend in person to communicating on the phone or by e-mail, and 81% would rather have a girlfriend or boyfriend who was not exactly good-looking but who had not undergone plastic surgery than someone beautiful because of plastic surgery.
Students demonstrated a concern and consideration for the natural environment: 63% said they were sensitive to seasonal changes and 51% refrained from using the air conditioner even in hot weather. Nearly 50% stated that they were conscious of environmental preservation as an issue in their daily lives. The survey results do not conform to the conventional image of the average high school student and his or her life, and it appears that a number of high school students do advocate a healthy life that is as natural as possible.

2004 VOL.70
Have High School Students Changed? - Comparisons of 1980, 1992 and 2003 surveys
First to third graders of private and public high schools in Kanto, Chubu, and Kyusyu areas
1,000 (males; 441, females; 559)
June to July, 2003
Questionnaire distributed by schools
This study examined changes in high school students over the past twenty years. It was noted that although students gave their high school and teachers high marks for atmosphere and enthusiasm, respectively; they are less interested in working hard to enter university. Students increasingly give priority to employment prospects over the name value or traditional prestige of a university. More students would rather select a vocational school offering a program of interest than a university lacking such a program. Private life is also given greater precedence over work, with an increasing number of students reporting that they would be content with a mid-level job and responsibilities in return for always being able to have Sundays off. As for future family life, the percentage of girls who wanted to become full-time homemakers declined by half, from 54.5% in 1980 to 25.3% in 2003. Boys who wanted their wives to be full-time homemakers fell drastically from 83.2% to 45.5%. These figures show that students are increasingly abandoning traditional notions of family and the sexual division of labor, wishing to create a happy family life based on mutual respect. The study shows that, in many respects, students are placing more value on their feelings and living life in a way that expresses their penchants.

2003 VOL.69
High School Students' View of Japan
First and second graders of three public high schools in Tokyo, Gunnma and Shizuoka
1,591 (males; 824, females; 767)
February to March 2003
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students were questioned when they felt Japanese or were aware of Japan. A majority answered that they had these feelings when they came into contact with traditional Japanese culture and life as typified by historic buildings in Kyoto and Nara, kimono, lacquer ware, tea ceremony ware, waka poetry, and Noh theater. Students at schools with regular international exchange programs tended to be more conscious of Japan, and it seems that learning about foreign countries leads to a greater awareness of being Japanese. Students who were more conscious of national identity tended to be more interested in ancient literature, Japanese history, English, and other subjects that highlighted cultural differences. Many of these students were involved in extracurricular activities and displayed a strong attachment to collectives such as the home, school, community, and Japan, and it appears that such involvement has a strong effect on the formation of students' awareness of themselves as Japanese and of Japan.

2003 VOL.68
The Five-day School Week for Senior High School Students
First to third graders of four public high schools in Tokyo, Gunma, and Niigata
1,387 (males; 583, females; 804)
November 2002
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Public schools in Japan began the five-day school week in April 2002. More than 65% of students and teachers welcome the change. However, students at schools for entry in highly selective universities show lower support for the change, and the higher the grade, the less support. This seems to indicate that students studying for university entrance exams are worried about their academic level given that many private schools hold classes on Saturday. Overall, high school students were pleased about the five-day school week, with most feeling that Saturday should not be spent at school. At present, however, rather than trying to use their Saturdays for something constructive, students are happy about having leisure time, and this seemed to be generally true of the average high school student.

2002 VOL.67
High School Teachers and Education Reform
Among the 111 selected high schools nationwide, 77 cooperated in each distributing questionnaires to 20 teachers. A total of 774 teachers responded, for a response rate of 34.9%.
774
February to March, 2002
Principals of cooperating schools distributed the questionnaire which was then completed and mailed back by the teachers themselves.
For first time since the introduction of 12-year education (6 years of elementary school, 3 years of junior high school and 3 years of high school) and coeducation after WWII, the education system in place for half a century is undergoing sweeping change that is causing considerable confusion in the classroom. The diverse reform measures are being implemented relatively quickly and seemingly with little input from teachers. While this alone is not reason for opposition, the reforms appear to have confused teachers. The questions examined their perceptions.

2002 VOL.66
Comparison of Japanese and South Korean Students' Perceptions of the Family
First to third year high school students in Tokyo (includes southern area of Ibaraki) and high school students in Seoul preparing for university
2,185(males; 789, females; 1,396, Tokyo; 1,176, Seoul; 1,009)
November to December, 2001
Questionnaire distributed by schools
The views of the younger generation in South Korea indicate a dramatic decline in the importance placed on traditional Confucian values and other changing perceptions. The questionnaire compared Japanese and South Korean students' perceptions of the family to examine similarities and differences between young people of the same generation from different countries.

2002 VOL.65
Are Students Really Serious?
First to third year students of 4 public and private high schools in Aomori, Akita, and Tokyo
1,355(males; 621, females; 734, first year; 675, second year; 400, third year; 280)
October to November, 2001
Questionnaire distributed by schools
At a recent conference, high school teachers noted that while students today have a serious attitude insofar as they do what they are told, they lack the motivation to set and achieve goals on their own. The questionnaire examined students' perceptions of what it means to take a serious attitude and the similarities and differences with the expectations of adults.

2001 VOL.64
Students at Colleges of Technology: A Comparison with the 1982 Survey
First- to third- year students of colleges of technology
2,448 (males, 1,070; females, 1,378); (agriculture; 384, Technology; 465, commerce; 414, domestic science; 223, nursing; 219, general; 448)
June to July 2001
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Rising Interest and Satisfaction
Many colleges of technology are trying to refashion themselves into institutes with distinct areas of expertise. What are students at colleges of technology thinking and what is their situation? This monograph compares students at these colleges today with students in vocational programs surveyed in "Monograph on High School Students Vol. 8." in 1982 and in ordinary high schools that were the subject of a recent monograph (Vol. 59-61). It indicates that students give their schools higher marks today.

2001 VOL.63
High School Students' Use of Media
First- to second- year students of public high schools in Tokyo and Akita (3 schools each)
1,851 (males, 678; females, 679); (first-year, 692; second-year; third-year, 665) (Tokyo; 673, Akita, 684)
January to March 2001
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Electronic Media in Daily Life
Cellular phones have proliferated in the past few years and become indispensable in our daily lives. How do high school students use electronic media? Focusing on four types of media in their daily lives, this monograph explores how high school students view and use cellular phones, music, television, and language.

2001 VOL.62
High School Students as Consumers
First- to third-year students of public high schools in Tokyo, Niigata, Miyagi, Fukuoka
2,020 (first year, 677; second year, 694; third year, 649; males, 826; females, 1,194)
October to November 2000
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students as sensible consumers
Bankruptcies, corporate restructuring, and ongoing economic sluggishness have followed the burst of the bubble economy. Many households are tightening their purse strings and spending less. What are consumption patterns among high school students? The survey examined the amount of their pocket money, their experience of working part-time, what they buy, what they think is important when shopping, their awareness of shopping, sense of money and life values, their future expectations, etc. It is clear that high school students today are very realistic.

2000 VOL.61
What High School Students are Required to Learn at School - Comparison with innovative schools
Regular schools: Survey of first- to third-year students in five public high schools with a conventional curriculum in Tokyo, Kanagawa, and Saitama
Innovative schools: Survey of first- to third-year students in three public high schools and one private high school with an innovative and experimental curriculum in the Tokyo metropolitan area
Regular schools: 1,522 (first-year, 481; second-year, 511; third- year, 530; male, 724; female, 790; unknown, 8)
Innovative schools: 803 (first-year, 274; second-year, 298; third- year, 214; fourth- to sixth-year, 17; male, 357; female, 440; unknown, 6)
June to July 2000
Questionnaire distributed by schools
At high school it is important to acquire academic skills in response to globalization and the aging society, and to find a close friend with whom one can get along well all the time!
Bullying, absence from school and a decline in academic achievement are problems that we face in our schools today. Society is changing very rapidly, becoming more information-oriented and the number of children is decreasing. High school students' views on school and studies are also changing. This survey looked into what students are satisfied about in their school life, what kind of studies they think are necessary, important factors and attractiveness in school selection, and the schools and subjects they are interested in. The survey also made a comparison between new types of public schools and conventional public high schools. As innovative experiments in the high school educational reform, these new schools have instituted courses for credit and international studies. There are also six-year private schools that have combined junior and senior high school. The survey compared and clarified the students' views on school.

2000 VOL.60
Self-image of High School Students
First- and second-year students in seven public high schools in three regions (Tohoku, Kanto, Kyushu consisting of one city and four prefectures)
1,826 (first year, 919; second year, 907; males, 821; females, 1,005)
February to March 2000
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students with no hope for the future and a sense of uncertainty!
What do high school students think and worry about? The survey investigated the self-image and concerns of high school students from various perspectives such as interpersonal relationships, the way they view themselves, people who have influenced them, the media, situations in which they exploded with anger, people they consulted, etc. It has become clear that high school students have a sense of uncertainty and are searching for how they should lead their life.

2000 VOL.59
High School Student's View of the 21st Century
First- and third-year students of six public high schools in Hokkaido, Gunma, Ibaraki, Osaka, Hyogo
1,518 (first year, 578; second year, 577; third year, 363; males, 778; females, 740)
October to November 1999
Questionnaire distributed by schools
The coming of an information-oriented society! Concerns about weak interpersonal relationships and the degradation of the natural environment
What expectations do high school students have? The survey asked them, as future adults of the 21st century, what they expect their lives to be like in the coming four to five years, ten years, thirty, and fifty years, about the sharing of housework and child rearing after marriage, care of the elderly, interpersonal relatrionships, social change, etc.

1999 VOL.58
High School Students' Attitudes toward Time
First- to third-year students of five public high schools in Aichi, Gunma, Tochigi
2,020 (first year, 984; second year, 657; third year, 379; males, 710; females, 1,307; unknown, 3)
July 1999
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students do not mind if their close friends, boyfriends or girlfriends are not punctual, but they get annoyed if a class continues for two or three minutes after the bell rings.
Due to the increase in heinous crimes by juveniles in recent years, the media reports that youngsters nowadays are impatient and easily explode with anger. In actuality, what are their limits? The survey looked into how they spend their time, how they react and their sense of time in various situations at school and in life.

1999 VOL.57
The Current Situation of Entrance Examinations for Universities
Second-year students of twelve public high schools in Hokkaido, Tohoku, Kanto, Chubu, Kansai, Chugoku, Shikoku, Kyushu
4,266 (males, 2,190; females, 2,062, unknown, 14)
February to March 1999
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students make sound decisions on their future and want to make the most of their abilities!
As the number of children declines, universities are reforming their entrance exams in various ways and offering some unique features. On the other hand, it seems that students find themselves in a very difficult environment. New graduates are having a hard time finding jobs due to the prolonged recession. As society rapidly changes and undergoes a wave of reforms, the survey showed how their ideas about the future and views of academic background and occupations have changed.

1999 VOL.56
How High School Students Look at Others - How to have easy-going interpersonal relationship
First- to third-year students of six public and private high schools in Hokkaido, Saitama, Fukuoka
1,512 (first-year, 732; second-year, 490; third year, 290; male, 731; female, 791)
Late in October to early in December 1998
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students want to have closer relationships with friends, but are satisfied to just maintain the current relationships with their families and teachers.
High school students in our pluralistic society today are said to be dispassionate and only want superficial interpersonal relationships. What kind of interpersonal relationships and self-image do they have? This survey looked into their relationships with friends, the degree of intimacy, how they maintain distance, sense of shame, and awareness of how others feel about them.

1998 VOL.55
The Collapse of Norms - Values of high school students
First- to third-year students of six public high schools and one private high school in Miyagi, Tokyo, Shimane, Ehime, Tokushima
2,377 (first year, 953; second year, 1,074; third year, 300; males, 1,036; females, 1,291)
June to July 1998
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Self-centeredness or self-orientation? Are norms changing?
Young people, who are said to have been more group-oriented and similar, are getting more individualized. On the other hand, it seems that juvenile crimes that are self-centered are increasing. One example is "compensated dating" or juvenile prostitution that is characterized by a self-centeredness that justifies the crime by saying that it does not hurt others, but is one's personal business. What norms do high school students have these days? The survey looked into their experience and awareness of deviant behavior.

1998 VOL.54
High School Students' Views on School Subjects - Academic skills for entrance exams and life
Survey 1 sampled the views of first- and second-year students on English, social studies, and music in five public high schools in Niigata, Tokyo, Saitama
Survey 2 sampled the views of first- to third-year students on home economics in public high schools in Tokyo, Saitama
Survey 1: 1,718 (males, 984; females, 734) Survey 2: 618 (males, 347; females, 271)
Survey 1: February to March 1998 Survey 2: February 1998
Survey 1, 2: Questionnaire distributed by schools
School subjects that high school students find useful!
The school curriculum is now being revised for a five-day school week. What do high school students think of their classes at school? The survey covered English, social studies, music and home economics and looked at their views on these subjects and the educational content and class style they prefer.

1998 VOL.53
Views on Society - Social awareness of high school students
read detail on Global Understanding, Volunteer Activities, Valuation of Japan, and Environmental Issues
First- to third-year students in 5 public high schools and 1 private high school in Tokyo, Chiba, Toyama, Fukui, Fukuoka
1,699 (males, 903; females, 792; unknown, 4)
October to November 1997
Questionnaire distributed by schools
High school students find friends, family and themselves important!
How do high school students take part in the society? The survey looked into their new awareness and views on society from various perspectives such as global awareness, views on Japan, environmental issues, volunteer activities and relationship with friends, and clarified their views on society.

1997 VOL.52
"Compensated Dating"
First- to third-year students of public high schools in Tokyo, Saitama
1726 (unknown, 1)
June to July 1997
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Is "compensated dating" something bad?
Recently 'compensated dating' or juvenile prostitition has become a controversial and common issue when talking about female high school students. The survey squarely examined this problem and investigated what they actually thought about it.

1997 VOL.51
Life and Death for High School Students
First- to third-year students of public high schools in Hiroshima, Tokushima, Okayama, Chiba, Fukushima, Yamagata
2,216 (males, 1,125; females, 1,080; unknown, 11)
April to May 1997
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Perception of Death Among High School Students
High school students these days live in a peaceful and affluent society. Death seems something totally unrelated to their existence, but they are surrounded by news of accidents, murders, and suicide due to bullying. In TV games, they kill their opponents to win. The survey looked into how they perceive death.

1997 VOL.50
Being Masculine and Feminine
First- and second-year students of public high schools in Tokyo, Sapporo, Fukuoka
1,719 (first year, 636; second year, 1,038; males, 905; females, 814)
February to March 1997
Questionnaire distributed by schools
Gentle and soft boys, strong and flexible girls
It is said that girls are more active and boys are quieter these days in various activities at high school. As the society becomes gender-free, their images of what is masculine and feminine also seem to be changing greatly. The survey looked into gender difference in career motivation, capabilities and resourcefulness in daily life, and formation of gender.

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