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The development of the Postural Control Support System and the Multilocomotor

Summary:

Ten percent of babies with a low birth weight less than 1,000 grams are diagnosed as having cerebral palsy. These babies have to start life with difficulties in both motor and cognitive development due to periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), intracranial hemorrhage and so forth. It is very difficult to predict their prognosis since damage to each child's central nervous system is different. And many researchers point out the limitations of the effects of physical therapy alone. However, some children with level 4 and 5 on the Gross Motor Function Classification System[1] can develop physical function by applying support techniques in early stages to the degree in which they can move without the help of others. One recent case involved a small child who is unable to maintain antigravity head and trunk posture when lying on her stomach(prone position)and sitting. She has also spasms in her lower limbs and difficulty with motor function of both upper limbs. I will report about a process I developed, the "Postural Control Support System," which helps the girl to maintain posture and "Multilocomotor" which helps her to move.

Keywords:
cerebral palsy, periventricular, postural control, locomotion, powered-mobility-device, cognitive development, emotion, sociality, participation, severe motor and intellectual disabilites

Japanese

*This paper is a translation of a Japanese paper, Shisei seigyo sodai undou kinou ni syougai wo motta kodomo no tameno kiki kaihatsu, Baby Science 2006. vol. 6, The Japanese Society of Baby Science.

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Junichi Takashio, Biwako Gakuen Medical and Welfare Center, Kusatsu, Shiga Prefecture
Masao Kumode, Biwako Gakuen Medical and Welfare Center, Kusatsu, Shiga Prefecture
Ichiro Uchiyama, Department of Psychology, Doshisha University, Kyoto
Joseph J. Campos, Institute of Human Development, University of California, Berkeley
David I. Anderson, Development of Kinesiology, San Francisco State University
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